Tarland and Mid Deeside Community First Responders

local volunteers helping save lives in our community

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a first aid technique that can be used if someone is not breathing properly or if their heart has stopped. Chest compressions and rescue breaths keep blood and oxygen circulating in the body.

If someone is not breathing normally and is not moving or responding to you after an accident, call 999 or 112 for an ambulance. If there is a defibrillator near by (click here for map) send someone to get it as quickly as possible. Then, if you can, start CPR straight away.

Hands-only CPR

If you have not been trained in CPR or are worried about giving mouth to- mouth resuscitation to a stranger, you can do chest compression-only (or hands-only) CPR.

To carry out a chest compression:

1) Place the heel of your hand on the breastbone (see picture below) at the centre of the person’s chest. Place your other hand on top of your first hand and interlock your fingers.
2) Keeping arms straight with elbows locked and using your body weight (not just your arms), press straight down by 5–6cm on their chest.
3) Repeat this until an ambulance arrives. Try to give 100 chest compressions a minute, 1-2 per second.


CPR

CPR with rescue breaths

1) Perform chest compressions as described above.
2) After every 30 chest compressions, give two breaths.
Tilt the casualty's head gently back and lift the chin up with two fingers. Pinch the person’s nose closed, take a breath in, seal your mouth over their mouth and breath out steadily and firmly into their mouth. The chest should rise, but if not, continue with the second breath. If the chest still doesn't rise, go back to chest compressions, and try again after another 30 chest compressions. Each rescue breath should last only a second.
3) Continue with cycles of 30 chest compressions and two rescue breaths until they begin to recover or emergency help arrives. Only stop if you are too exhausted to continue or you are told to by a professional.